Day: July 9, 2010

The Election of Jack Murphy in 1957 | The Irish Story

Interesting and scarily relevant article about an unemployed TD in 1957 Ireland.

In the Dáil / Hunger strike
Murphy had difficulty trying to get answers to even the most basic questions in the Dáil. He could not even get an answer to how much unemployment relief money was being spent in Dublin.[32]

In May Murphy and two other members of the UPC, Tommy Kavanagh and Jimmy Byrne, began a hunger strike to highlight unemployment and to protest against the removal of food subsidies in the budget.[33]

The hunger strike lasted four days and each evening thousands of protestors gathered on the corners of Abbey Street and O’Connell Street.[34] Resolutions of support came in from trade union branches all over the country and there were demands for a one day strike.

via The Election of Jack Murphy in 1957 | The Irish Story.

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Quick Link: Midleton & Fermoy Books: Appaloosa – Robert B. Parker

A nice review on the rather excellent review blog over at Midleton & Fermoy books.

The novel is narrated from the viewpoint of Everett Hitch the friend and partner of Virgil Cole. The two are itinerant lawmen in the American west of 1882, hired to sort out the problems of the town of Appaloosa in New Mexico Territory by the town’s Board of Aldermen. Rancher Randall Bragg and his hands have taken effective control of the town having murdered the Sheriff and one deputy, his men take what they want, they do not pay, if you object you will be shot. Cole and Hitch are sworn in as lawmen and set about applying the law – as written by them.

via Midleton & Fermoy Books: Appaloosa – Robert B. Parker.

Go Read This: Pirates’ wages

A very fine post by Brian O’Leary over at Magellan Media Partners:

The story broke pretty fast, and various news organizations struggled with how to “cover” a story for which the content was effectively unavailable.  Time.com and Politico decided the story was the story, and so “fair use” could justify copying an entire article and posting it on their sites.

via Pirates’ wages.

Bozo Sapiens: Operation Charnwood: Saturation

I do love the writing and tone of the Bozo Sapiens pieces!

The lesson of World War I was that huge artillery barrages on entrenched positions achieve little. Armor was the answer – but the British were short of armor. They decided instead on a huge bombardment from the air. The hope was that a precise but devastating raid on key points would clear the way for a swift and direct infantry attack

via Bozo Sapiens: Operation Charnwood: Saturation.

It should Need To Be Said But: Gina Centrello: EBooks Will Be 50% Of Book Sales In Five Years – mediabistro.com: eBookNewser

While a technology may change, Centrello said that a publisher’s core mission remains the same: To deliver books to readers. “A publisher’s job is to deliver books in any form that the reader wants to read them,” she said.

via Gina Centrello: EBooks Will Be 50% Of Book Sales In Five Years – mediabistro.com: eBookNewser.

Pub Rants: Why You Can’t Buy An eBook In English Outside The U.S.

Not confusing at all! Interesting to think through this post and follow the competing agendas, reader’s, author’s, agent’s and publisher’s:

If I sell Title X for North American rights only, then that means the US publisher is only allowed to sell its English version in the US, Canada, US territories (aka Philippines etc), and non-exclusive in select countries in the rest of the world (clearly listed in the contract). Print or ebook. The reason for this is that we want the ability to sell English to UK or ANZ (Australia) separately and UK/ANZ insists on certain “exclusive territories” for its print and electronic edition.

Are you starting to see the problem? If UK/ANZ hasn’t been sold, then no eBook version in English is available in let’s say Denmark because Europe is considered exclusive to UK in terms of selling the English edition.

via Pub Rants: Why You Can’t Buy An eBook In English Outside The U.S..

Top five: Fashion History (via Pue's Occurrences)

Nice post on the top five books on fashion history!
Enjoyable read!
Eoin

Top five: Fashion History Contributed by Niamh Cullen ‘Nothing happened, except that we all dressed up’. So John Lennon ironically dismissed the social and cultural revolution that was 1960s London, in a 1970 interview for Rolling Stone magazine. If the ‘swinging sixties’ in London can be encapsulated by the image of the miniskirt, it doesn’t mean that the cultural revolution that took place during than decade was a superficial one, but that clothes came, in a very real w … Read More

via Pue's Occurrences