Pub Rants: Why You Can’t Buy An eBook In English Outside The U.S.

Not confusing at all! Interesting to think through this post and follow the competing agendas, reader’s, author’s, agent’s and publisher’s:

If I sell Title X for North American rights only, then that means the US publisher is only allowed to sell its English version in the US, Canada, US territories (aka Philippines etc), and non-exclusive in select countries in the rest of the world (clearly listed in the contract). Print or ebook. The reason for this is that we want the ability to sell English to UK or ANZ (Australia) separately and UK/ANZ insists on certain “exclusive territories” for its print and electronic edition.

Are you starting to see the problem? If UK/ANZ hasn’t been sold, then no eBook version in English is available in let’s say Denmark because Europe is considered exclusive to UK in terms of selling the English edition.

via Pub Rants: Why You Can’t Buy An eBook In English Outside The U.S..

Top five: Fashion History (via Pue's Occurrences)

Nice post on the top five books on fashion history!
Enjoyable read!
Eoin

Top five: Fashion History Contributed by Niamh Cullen ‘Nothing happened, except that we all dressed up’. So John Lennon ironically dismissed the social and cultural revolution that was 1960s London, in a 1970 interview for Rolling Stone magazine. If the ‘swinging sixties’ in London can be encapsulated by the image of the miniskirt, it doesn’t mean that the cultural revolution that took place during than decade was a superficial one, but that clothes came, in a very real w … Read More

via Pue's Occurrences

Quick Link: Tony Woodlief: Curse of the Copyright Holders and Their Fee-Seeking Lawyers, – WSJ.com

But in dollar terms, some decisions by copyright holders, rather than optimize the artist’s revenue and distribution, insure the opposite. When I asked to use a single line by songwriter Joe Henry, for example, his record label’s parent company demanded $150 for every 7,500 copies of my book. Assuming I sell enough books to earn back my modest advance, this amounts to roughly 1.5% of my earnings, all for quoting eight words from one of Mr. Henry’s songs.

via Tony Woodlief: Curse of the Copyright Holders and Their Fee-Seeking Lawyers, – WSJ.com.