Day: August 24, 2010

Quick Link | Leather: books and packaging « Bespoke Editions

I’m telling you, this new Kate Hyde endeavor is the way forward for books. Especially once the market for actual physical books gets smaller and smaller over the next twenty years or so.

Like most bibliophiles, I adore leather-bound books, especially the smell. Yet you’ll almost never see a fine leather-bound book in commercial publishing. The decision to feature genuine leather is pretty much confined to those with a serious commitment to the art of bookbinding or rare book conservation. The reason is the extreme expense and the necessity of foil blocking the books, preferably by hand for a small quantity, which prices it well above what most people are prepared to pay, even for a very special gift. (A very fine example of a leather book done traditionally on a relatively large scale of print run: the Folio The Luttrell Psalter.)

via Leather: books and packaging « Bespoke Editions.

Go Read This | There’s only one Seth Godin, but there are other authors who might emulate him – The Shatzkin Files

A rather good piece by Mike Shatzkin on Seth’s move.

Publishers should have remembered the axiom that you should be careful what you wish for. This was, perhaps, the beginning of the unbundling of the publisher’s suite of services to the author. It used to be that the publication of a book was the platform and the publishers’ publicity and marketing efforts worked to capitalize on it. This was all part and parcel of the package: paying an advance; editing and shaping the book; putting it into a distributable (printed and bound) form; getting it known; and, of course, getting it into a store where a customer could buy it.

via There’s only one Seth Godin, but there are other authors who might emulate him – The Shatzkin Files.

Quick Link | Seth Godin Drives Another Nail Into the Book

Mathew Ingram adds some interesting nuance to the Seth Godin reaction:

Not every author or artist has that ability, and not every book is going to find an established audience that way. There are still going to be mass-market blockbusters in publishing, just as there are in movies and music, where the marketing machine goes into high gear to reach as large an audience as possible. But for established authors and artists who specialize in a particular niche, connecting directly with readers or fans can be a far better approach than relying on the traditional infrastructure of the content-distribution industry. At the end of the day, that is a good thing for fans of both books and music.

via Seth Godin Drives Another Nail Into the Book.