Go Read This | KOBO™ BREAKS EBOOK RECORDS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON — Kobo

I’m always amused by press releases that include either selective or somewhat confusing stats. Kobo’s press release if full of those. However I’m intrigued by them. Try and see if you can get anything meaningful from it. Nice to see Emma Donoghue in the top gifted though!

Kobo became the first eReading service to launch an eBook gifting and gift card program and for the first time in history, eBooks “arrived” digitally in people’s email accounts this Christmas morning. The top three most popular eBooks gifted this holiday were:

• “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson

• “The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet’s Nest” by Stieg Larsson

• “Room” by Emma Donahue

via KOBO™ BREAKS EBOOK RECORDS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON — Kobo.

Go Read This | On Wikipedia, Cultural Patrimony, and Historiography | booktwo.org

I’ve long been struck by how, despite the ease of creation, publication and distribution, much digital text, from email to blog posts, is in fact essential ephemeral rather than permanent. James Bridle hits on some of this in a wonderful post today that covers his talk at dConstruct2010 in Brighton. Frankly, I wonder how many times I can call James a genius before it gets embarrassing, but he is one and this is another fine example of his impressive thinking.

Which struck me pretty hard, that bit about atemporality, and the flatness of digital memory, but particularly our lack of awareness of this situation. I talked about the Library of Alexandria, and the Yo La Long Dia, and the National Libraries of Bosnia-Herzegovina and Iraq—all examples of cultural destruction caused in part by neglect and willful disregard for our shared patrimony.

These losses, despite their horror, will always happen: but what can we do to mitigate and understand it? In a world obsessed with “facts”, a more nuanced comprehension of historical process would enable us to better weigh truth, whether it concerns the evidence for going to war, the proliferation of damaging conspiracy theories, the polarisation of debate on climate change, or so many other issues. This sounds utopian, and it is. But I do believe that we’re building systems that allow us to do this better, and one of our responsibilities should be to design and architect those systems to make this explicit, and to educate.

via On Wikipedia, Cultural Patrimony, and Historiography | booktwo.org.

Go Read This | The Great App Bubble | Fast Company

A very wise young woman I know has been saying this for ever. Why spend on an app for the Apple devices when you can for much less, make your websites faster on EVERYONE’s mobile. I agree wholeheartedly.

Marketers are spending money on iDevice apps at the expense of improving their mobile Web sites that everyone with a smart phone can access. According to Ahonen and Moore, iDevice app development actually costs 10 times more and reach is 50 times worse. Sex appeal will only trump pragmatic reach for so long.

via The Great App Bubble | Fast Company.

Go Read This | David Worlock | Paradigm Lost

Reading David’s pieces always brings a fresh perspective. This one is no different.

The sector has never seen a company like Google for using its wealth to pursue opportunity outside of its core markets . From YouTube to Android , from DoubleClick to Aardvark , from Google Earth to Google Energy , the company sometimes seems to be restlessly evading its destiny while remaining 98% tied to advertising for its revenues .

For its destiny is surely now reasonably clear . There will be a decline in search as an apps orientated world moves more fundamentally towards solutions . Already Google is feeling some of this , as well as the continuing movement of advertising markets away from the traditional way of contextualization. There will be continuing pressure within solutions created for professional and business services for search to be customized to need , and good enough for active purposes ( which may be better or more targeted or more rigorously selective or more representative of niche user groups than public search environments ) .

via David Worlock | Paradigm Lost

Link Post: Now’s The Time for Nokia To Dump MeeGo For Android

Not much to argue with here!

The Finnish handset maker can save money, reduce development costs and still play to its hardware design strengths with Android. Between unique hardware and — if Nokia felt the need — a customized interface, Android-powered Nokia handsets would rival those of HTC, a company that embraced Android early on and is enjoying more than 66 percent year-over-year revenue growth. While HTC thrives thanks to Android, Nokia is instead reducing already low sales expectations. Maybe MeeGo needs go away before it actually arrives on Smartphones.

Now’s The Time for Nokia To Dump MeeGo For Android.