History

Heritage Week Launched | OVER 1100 EVENTS ANNOUNCED AT LAUNCH OF NATIONAL HERITAGE WEEK EVENT GUIDE « Heritage Week

Who couldn’t do with this? Even if you don’t plan to get married anytime soon!

Talk & Tea: An Eighteenth-Century Gentlewoman’s Guide to Marriage, Donegal County Museum, High Rd., Letterkenny, Co Donegal (FREE) Wednesday 25th August, 7-9pm. Talk explores the way in which love and marriage were dealt with during the eighteenth century. Talk covers issues including courtship, legal requirements for marriage, the ‘companionate’ marriage, marriage customs, the duties of a wife.

via OVER 1100 EVENTS ANNOUNCED AT LAUNCH OF NATIONAL HERITAGE WEEK EVENT GUIDE « Heritage Week.

Quick Link | Dublin Life in 1597: Gunpowder,Explosions and Strikes. « Irish History Podcast

Fantastic post today from Irish History Podcast on a little known explosion that ripped apart a large portion of Dublin city in the 16th Century:

It didn’t take a genius to figure out what caused the explosion itself. That week a shipment of gunpowder had arrived in the city and was being off loaded onto the quays. The gunpowder was for the English army waging the Nine years war (1594-1603) against the O Neills amongst others. Normally this powder would be transported the short distance from the quays up to the castle (see map below). However that week conflict arose between the porters in the city and castle officials and a large supply of gun powder built up on the quays. At lunchtime on Friday it exploded with devastating consequences demolishing twenty houses around the Woodquay area of the city.

via Dublin Life in 1597: Gunpowder,Explosions and Strikes. « Irish History Podcast.

Quick Link – Bozo Sapiens: The Rainbow Warrior Sinking: Necessity

Another fine post from the Bozo Sapiens folks!

Seeing an opening, Greenpeace campaigners brought their flagship, Rainbow Warrior, to New Zealand. Their plan was to sail into the military exclusion zone around the atoll, forcing the French to abandon their tests for fear of endangering life.  It was a gesture, and an insulting one. L’État responded.

via Bozo Sapiens: The Rainbow Warrior Sinking: Necessity.

Some Excellent History Podcasts

[picapp align=”left” wrap=”true” link=”term=volcano&iid=8604972″ src=”7/a/1/c/Ash_spews_from_8f77.jpg?adImageId=12678428&imageId=8604972″ width=”380″ height=”534″ /]First and foremost I thought I’d remind us all that we live in times historic. A time that despite enormous change and significant scientific achievement can still be grounded by natural causes and nature itself.

But what this blogpost is about is three great history podcasts. New Books In History, Don Carlin’s, Hardcore History and 12 Byzantine Rulers.

For a long time, I missed the potential of podcasts. I didn’t own an mp3 player of any kind and I love radio so I was happy enough to listen to whatever was on air when I was walking, reading or working. Then I got an iPod Touch!

Since then I’ve found four podcasts that I listen to nearly everyday, some for short period like Mattins, a wonderful daily short reading by James Bridle and sometimes for more than an hour.

These three offer different things, one, New Books In History, is very focussed and about a single topic per episode with an obvious connection to the book being discussed. Hardcore History is much broader and covers topics in depth sometimes stretching over multiple episodes. The last, 12 Byzantine Rulers, is focussed and precise yet covers a huge sweeping history over a series that lasts about 17 episodes.

I heartily recommend them all!
Eoin

Taoiseach – TV3's new series

I have to say, I didn’t expect this of TV3. I missed the news that it was running and so missed the first episode on one of the most interesting men t hold the office, WT Cosgrave (whom we’ve mentioned here before).

The Independent carries a fine piece by John-Paul McCarthy about the series:

Cosgrave was in many ways an essentially theocratic politician, a deeply devout Catholic who once proposed that an ecclesiastical commission vet parliamentary legislation for theological deviance as soon as the statutes emerged from the Dail print shop.

And yet he held office under a classically liberal constitution, complete with an American-style establishment clause banning preferential treatment for a state church and an essentially British division of competences between an executive, a lower house and an upper house possessed of some interesting delaying powers. The Catholic Gulliver was thus immobilised for 15 years by these delicate constitutional chains. Cosgrave was also mild-mannered, unambitious personally and prone on occasion to diplomatic illnesses which allowed him to avoid contentious cabinet tussles between his headstrong subordinates. (He was formally ill during the Army Mutiny crisis in 1924 and sought to direct events from hospital.) And yet, circumstances forced Cosgrave to become arguably the most ruthless civilian chief executive the Irish State has ever produced.

Looking forward to catching up and watching the rest!
Eoin

Video Review: The Gutenberg Revolution: How Printing Changed The Course Of History

DARN: Somehow I managed to shave the final minutes off the video while recording! Still, the main points are covered.

A short video review of John Man’s book, The Gutenberg Revolution: How Printing Changed The Course Of History, on Johann Gutenberg, the inventor of the printing press and creator of the Gutenberg Bibles.

I discuss the merits of the book, how well written it is, the way that it deals nicely with the material, especially relating to the innovation and inventiveness of Gutenberg and how satisfying a read it is.

The Gutenberg Revolution

The Gutenberg Revolution


You can get a copy of the book here from rbooks, Random House’ customer facing bookstore.