Frankfurt Book Fair

My Piece For FAQ | Silicon Dock: Are there any spill-over effects for the Irish publishing scene?

I wrote a piece for the Frankfurt Book Fair’s FAQ magazine this quarter about whether or not there was an impact being felt amongst traditional publishers in Ireland from the presence of large tech companies who have made Dublin and Ireland a base of operations in Europe:

The web forms a core part of their businesses in a way that is not yet true of traditional publishers. While they are growing their e-book segments, the latter still do most of their business in paper and print. This crucial difference might be the reason why traditional publishing has not felt much direct impact from the tech firms. Most traditional publishers have little interaction with them and, while the newer and smaller innovative publishers might use their platforms, services and tools, there is not much they can give the tech giants and not much the tech giants can give them.

‘I don’t see that the presence of the large new media and tech companies has had any particular impact on the domestic publishing industry,’ says Ivan O’Brien from The O’Brien Press. ‘They don’t really interact with us, and they inhabit a multi-national space, generally dealing with companies with a whole lot more money than we have!’

via Silicon Dock: Are there any spill-over effects for the Irish publishing scene? | Frankfurt Academy Quarterly

Monza, The Frankfurt Book Fair & A Sunny Athlone

So here’s some cool news and it comes in two parts.

The first is that I leave on Sunday for UNESCO’s World Forum on Culture and Cultural Industries, Focus 2011: The Book Tomorrow: the Future of the Written Word in Villa Reale di Monza, Lombardia, Italy. I’m very much looking forward to it. I’ll be rapporteur for a panel on Blog Vs Newspaper.

The second thing is that the same event marks the kick off of my association with The Frankfurt Bookfair’s English language blog. Starting after the conference when I’ll be blogging about copyright in the digital age (a major topic of discussion at the event), I’ll be adding blogs on the topics of rights, licensing and digitization, key concerns of the Fair.

I’m really excited by the link up and I hope folks will join me over there when I post.

In the meantime, it’s the Friday of a bank holiday weekend in Ireland and I’m leaving Dublin for the evening, heading to Athlone to watch Clockwork Noise.

If you are going, I’ll see you in Monza, if you are not, I’ll write all about it over here.

Enjoy the weekend,
Eoin

PS: Yes, that picture IS of the building where the forum happens!
PPS: Here’s a night-time shot just for fun!

Image Credit:
Top – AttributionSome rights reserved by ezioman

Bottom – AttributionSome rights reserved by ezioman

Frankfurt 2010

I’m leaving Dublin this afternoon for Frankfurt, Germany to attend the Frankfurt Book Fair 2010.

This year I have a busier schedule than I had originally imagined I would, but a fun one nonetheless with some downtime too (though perhaps not enough).

Tuesday sees talks at both O’Reilly’s smashing Tools Of Change Frankfurt-2010 and Canada Livres’ International Rights Seminar.

I’ll be talking about The Irish Story and what small (and large) publishers can learn, do and plan for based on it. In many was it is a talk about the practical side of my Pecha Kucha speech at Tools Of Change 2009.

At Canada Livres, I’m taking a slightly different look at things, from a more theoretical direction, but with some practical advice for publishers, remembering too that Canada and Ireland are both alike and very different.

On top of that I’ll be meeting publishers from near and far and reporting for Irish Publishing News. You can follow my Tweets which will be tagged #fbf10 for the fair and #tocf10 for Tools Of Change, not sure what the Canada Livres hash-tag is but as soon as I have it, I will update.
I’m looking forward to it.

If you are around, see you in Frankfurt.
Eoin

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Image Credit, Danny Sullivan (via Flickr), Attribution 2.0