india

Go Read This | John Makinson Interview In The Times of India

Not terribly in-depth, nonetheless interesting. Especially when discussing the challenges of being too large (pointing to the value of imprints in the minds of authors) and responding to concerns about Amazon’s self publishing offering (highlighting in this case the ownership of Author Solutions, something I think indicates a lack of appreciation of what Amazon is doing in the digital self publishing space). Where he offers the most interesting note though is below:

At the time of the merger, you said one of the key areas of focus would be e-books . How do you plan to go about the shift?

We have to be guided by the preferences of the reader or the consumer. If they want to read a book on a smartphone we have to give it to them. It doesn’t make a difference if they are reading a physical book or an e-book . What does make a difference is channel substitution. The move from physical to digital books is not as important as the shift from bookstores to online stores. This really affects the way people find and read books.

via ‘Amazon is creating a large market for books’ – The Times of India.

Go Read This | Macmillan to sell Indian BPO – The Times of India

I don’t know if this is prompted by the sense that what MPS provides can be bought from other providers as easily as using an in-house outfit, or if the idea is to release an internally impressive unit from the constraints of a traditional parent. Whatever the logic, I’m intrigued by this:

Global publishing giant Macmillan Group is set to sell its Indian technology solutions and BPO firm MPS, said banking sources said. Macmillan holds 61% stake in MPS, which is listed on the domestic bourses.

The Bangalore-based MPS employs around 1,000 people and undertakes publishing services work for the UK-based parent as well as third party clients. Ernst & Young has been mandated to find a suitor for MPS.

via Macmillan to sell Indian BPO – The Times of India.

Go Read This:Brave New World – Chasing Cheap Labour in a Digital World

Well worth reading this today from Martyn Daniels and an interesting counter point to the previously tweeted video from O’Reilly Radar. To me, this is why capitalism works, because as economies grow and develop they push standard of living higher and increase income across the board, especially as countries play to their competitive advantages. Fascinating to see it impact hugh-tech companies so rapidly.

The most interesting point is that counties such as China and India no longer want the low end assembly and service work. “China doesn’t want to be the workshop of the world anymore,” says Pietra Rivoli, a professor of international business at Georgetown University. India is already maturing as a workforce and aspirations and wages are growing fast. The question is will the West pay more or simply flow to the next cheap source of labour?

via Brave New World: Chasing Cheap Labour in a Digital World.