Maps

Quick Links for the day

Eoin Purcell

There is a great history timeline on BBC History site. It is well worth visiting and spending some time on. The internal links are excellent and the extra material is smashing!

Coming Anarchy has a fascinating post about the strange borders that make up the modern Malaysia. The comments offer some interesting bits too.

For those of us, slightly obsessed with the US Civil War, I offer A Civil War Blog and this fine example of the authors posts, a list of his top ten Civil War Blogs.

RTÉ’s US Election Coverage

When theory becomes reality
One thing the internet does is allow organisations provide almost infinite options for their viewers/readers or listeners. You don’t see it too much in practice though.

That’s why I like RTÉ’s US election coverage (*) right now. They have revamped the site so it looks different from the news page: have look here and they have

More importantly they are pulling in material from around the web, provided by others that adds value for their users. The Political Compass, The NPR Feed, The Electoral College Explained and a really nice Electoral College Map and I’ve just spotted they have an electoral vote counter on the main page too!

By far the best element of the site though is the extra content and access to the correspondents and reporters who are in the US. There is a Charlie Bird blog, a Robert Shortt blog that includes some vlogs and a Mark Little blog. That is exactly what a media organisation should be using the web to do, to centralise their content and to pull in the best of the rest.

Very impressed,
Eoin

(*) Some people I know [and like] work at rté.ie so I might be biased. I don’t think so, but I think it’s worth saying.

Links – 23/01/2008

Visit Gongblog for a series of great graphics on China and India’s role in the world economy. For while I have been annoying one of my good friends with the idea that China has traditionally accounted for about 30% of the world economy and will over time return to norm. Its a nonsense notion in one sense but seems to be emerging as truth. Of course it could as easily not have happened this way since 1920 or so but it has. Interesting.
HERE

Lost and Found. One of the best documentary movies I have ever seen. I lost the address, got the address and finally got around to posting it. and sending an e-mail I’d love the answer to be positive on!
Here

Sweet! Stanford University iTunes lectures. Download-a-go-go! [Launches iTunes]
Here

Who doesn’t like a good map?

Eoin Purcell

And Google Serve some really good ones up today
In what has to be my all time favourite Inside Google Book Search post, relatively new Google employee Mathew Grey says:

We’ve all seen views of the Earth from space, where the numerous pinpoints of light on the ground combine to yield a speckled map of the world. I wanted to show the Earth viewed from books, where individual mentions of locations in books combine to yield another interpretation of the globe. The intensity of each pixel is proportional to the number of times the location at a given set of coordinates is mentioned across all of the books in Google Books Search.

Go look at the maps they really are something, though I’d love some higher res versions.

Damn I love cool stuff
Eoin