Go Listen To This | Today – The ‘worrying’ battle for books

Really excellent piece on Today about books, publishing, prices and piracy. Some great voices and opinions there:

Despite £3bn being spent on books in the UK last year, a dark digital cloud of uncertainty still hangs over the world of publishing.

In the second of his reports into the impact of technology on the world of books, arts editor Will Gompertz looks at what the digital revolution means for the publishing business.

via BBC News – Today – The ‘worrying’ battle for books.

Go Read This | My Battle With E-Pirates – Advice – The Chronicle of Higher Education

A really excellent piece on navigating the murky waters of piracy in academic publishing [HT Joe Esposito]

A popular file-sharing Web site was offering pirated electronic copies of the book. Someone had stolen a copy of the e-book version and uploaded it to the file-sharing site. Now it could be downloaded free by anyone.

I was startled for several reasons. First, the retail price of a print copy of the book is $90, and the official e-book version is $74, so its free availability online seemed an obvious disincentive for anyone to buy it. Second, as I described in another column, I have mixed feelings about open-access scholarship. Several years earlier, an open-access project of mine had been plagiarized and printed in a commercial “closed access” book, and now my commercial closed-access book was in some sense made open-access to everybody—again without my consent. Third, even I—the editor—didn’t possess a copy of the official e-book version, yet there it was for everyone else.

But was the piracy my problem? And was it really a problem?

via My Battle With E-Pirates – Advice – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Go Read This | Women help fuel rise in e-book piracy

How do you know you are doing something wrong?

When 35-year-old women are a problem for your industry. Seriously, does ANYONE really believe that this age-group are pirating ebooks because they ‘hate’ publishers or dislike copyright?

No, they are downloading ebooks from illegal sources because they can’t find legal ones, the prices at legal sites are well beyond what they think are fair or simply because they haven’t been reached by legitimate publishers.

Doesn’t make it right in itself but it does suggest there is work to be done by the industry that isn’t ENFORCEMENT work.

ON top of which the report continues with the whole one illegal download = one lost sale nonsense which just drives me mad!

According to the Digital Entertainment Survey, conducted by Entertainment Media Research on behalf of Wiggin, a media law firm, one in eight female tablet or e-reader owners over the age of 35 admits to downloading “unauthorised” copies of e-books.

via FT.com / UK / Business – Women help fuel rise in e-book piracy.

Quick Link | Pirates, You Be Bleedin’ Me Dry. Please Stop. « All Things Moorehawke and Otherwise

If you read this blog much, you’ll know I’m not a believer in the old “one download equals one lost sale” routine. However I can’r escape the moral rightness of authors and publishers who object to their material being pirated. Celine Kiernan, authors the rather excellent Moorehawk Triology, writes about her thoughts on the issue in a very frank blog post:

I’m just going to ask you to stop. Ok? Stop stealing money from my pocket, sales from my reputation, and business from the legit booksellers and sites who legally support me and others like me. If you can’t afford to buy my work then, please, go to the library – at least they keep track of how many times the books are checked out – and those reports go back to my publishers, and believe it or not, that’s important.

via Pirates, You Be Bleedin’ Me Dry. Please Stop. « All Things Moorehawke and Otherwise.

Go Read This | More on the Death of Publishers | Mssv

I’m not sure I agree that publishers have done nothing as this suggests, but even so, it is worth reading:

But why would the average person not pirate eBooks? Like Cory Doctorow says, it’s not going to become any harder to type in ‘Toy Story 3 bittorrent’ in the future – and ‘Twilight ePub’ is even easier to type, and much faster to download to boot.

After Christmas, tens of millions of people will have the motive, the means, and the opportunity to perform book piracy on a massive scale. It won’t happen immediately, but it will happen. It’ll begin with people downloading electronic copies of books they already own, just for convenience’s sake (and hey, the New York Times says it’s ethical!). This will of course handily introduce them to the world of ebook torrents.

via More on the Death of Publishers | Mssv.