Tools

Go Read This | Medium and Being Your Own Platform – Marco.org

Wise words from Marco, worth holding in mind all the time, especially in the sections below and when he admonishes us to have “a domain name you control and are able to easily take your content and traffic with you to another tool or host at any time*”:

Treat places like Medium the way you’d treat writing for someone else’s magazine, for free. It serves the same purpose: your writing gets to appear in a semi-upscale setting and you might temporarily get more readers than you would elsewhere, but you’re giving up ownership and a lot of control to get that.

Whether it’s worthwhile to you should depend on whether you want to establish yourself as a writer, whether you want to get paid for it in some form, and whether you can get an audience elsewhere on your own. Plenty of people can answer “no” to all three, especially if they do something else extremely time-consuming for a living and want an occasional place to write, but don’t have the time or inclination to try building regular audiences or become known for their writing. People who sometimes want to write, but never want to become even part-time writers.

via Medium and Being Your Own Platform – Marco.org.

 

* I use WordPress.com to run my site here, but I own the domain name and several others on which I can run the content which I export and back-up regularly.

Go Read This | Developing digital strategies for the information marketplace | Supporting the migration of information providers and content players into the networked services world of the future.

David Worlock is so damn smart! Don’t make the mistake of thinking this piece of analysis is in any way limited to the legal arena. It makes considerable sense in any profession or industry facing change and disruption (that’s all of them):

We have to recall that Messrs Dow and Millerchip left Slaughter and May where they had been working lawyers in search of efficiencies . In other words , they were not the editorial/academic lawyers normally employed by publishers . This says something about the sort of people Thomson Reuters and Lexis will need to employ to get this huge transition right .

via David Worlock | Developing digital strategies for the information marketplace | Supporting the migration of information providers and content players into the networked services world of the future..

Bait ‘n’ Beer | A blog about books, publishing and their intersection with technology. Among other things.

Don’s right on the money here and it plays nicely into the theme I was getting at with my last link too. Read this and think about these things after Christmas:

For example, it’s great to have new discovery tools, but for better or worse, actual book sales (both print and digital) still rely on identifiers and other metadata to facilitate an actual transaction. Subscriptions and rentals require the ability not only to ingest and display titles and the accompanying metadata, but also to serve content in multiple formats, to interface with accounting and royalty systems and to provide a data mining tools for publishers, among other things.

Direct-to-consumer businesses, both on the sales side and on the self-publishing side require skills not typically found in book publishing businesses, including customer acquisition, understanding the lifetime value of customers/users, customer service and the ability to deal with many small transactions rather than a relative handful of larger orders from more traditional wholesale and retail customers.

via Bait ‘n’ Beer | A blog about books, publishing and their intersection with technology. Among other things..