War

Quick Link | 'Remembering'- the city's involvement in World War I – Londonderry Today

Sounds like a fascinating book this!

In Londonderry, as in many other parts of the country, economic necessity as much as a sense of loyalty may well have been a factor in so many men from both the Protestant and Catholic traditions heading for the various battlefields of Europe. In recent years it has been revealed that almost 50 per cent of the names recorded on the City’s Diamond War Memorial hailed from the Catholic/nationalist community. But, with the advent of the Easter Rising in 1916 and again at onset of the Troubles in 1969 it is true that those from the Catholic tradition felt uncomfortable recognising or remembering the involvement of their ancestors in service to the Crown.

via ‘Remembering’- the city’s involvement in World War I – Londonderry Today.

George Monck, Charles II and his Mistresses

Eoin Purcell

Charles II with thanks to Flickr user Lynn (http://www.flickr.com/photos/apophysis_rocks/)

Charles II with thanks to Flickr user Lynn (http://www.flickr.com/photos/apophysis_rocks/)

I studied the restoration of Charles II during my Masters research. My focus was on George Monck, by far the most interesting character in my mind, maybe because he seems something of a silent type who when he acts, acts decisively. I also believe that his actions were never as clear as history now suggests them to be, for instance I suspect that had the situation presented itself differently, he might well have made himself king or Lord Protector, rather than facilitating the return of the Stuarts.

In any case I write this for two reason. Wonders & Marvels has a Merry post about Charles II and his string of mistresses written by novelist Susan Holloway Scott and it got me to thinking and searching the web for material on Monck which resulted in discovering this site which is planning to Monck’s Observations upon Military & Political Affairs.
As per usual though little searching on Google Books and the disappointing result is that although copies have plainly been scanned and although the book is WELL out of copyright, it is not available for full view. A real shame.
Eoin

The Fall of House Habsburg: Edward Crankshaw

Eoin Purcell

A line to unsettle you on a bank holiday Monday:

. . . she delighted in the sensitive dreamer’s nature of her second son, Maximilian, who was to dream himself to death before a firing squad in Mexico.

I picked up rather nice edition of this in hardback when I was in the US a while ago but I have only started reading it recently. A few great lines already and the historian’s biases are fairly open an clear. It is well worth reading.

– GBS data here
– LibraryThing data here
– Worldcat data here